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The Orionid meteor shower peaks this week, but don’t expect to see many ‘shooting stars’ Oktober 21

Asking someone the name of the comet gives you 90% confidence that the comet you choose will be Halley’s Comet. Orionid meteor showers, this most famous comet, Halley’s Comet, travels around the Sun out of Neptune’s orbit and into an elliptical orbit close to the Sun only inside Venus’s orbit. Trekking that takes about 75 years to complete. Hari visited the last Sun in 1986 and returned to the midsummer 2061 Sun and near Earth.

I want to have a second greeting when Halley comes back, but it’s not possible. I know, I wasn’t 30 when I saw my last appearance. I would make a lot of good wishes to stick to my vitamins … Well, you are doing math. Yes, but not possible. But for the next few days, you and I will have the opportunity to see some pieces of tension (“comet debris”, if necessary) passing through our wait in oily form. increase.

Halley’s Comet’s orbit has access close to the orbits of the two Earths. One point will produce an oil-based display known as Eta Aquarids in early May. Another perspective is to generate the Orion meteor in mid-to-late October.

Orionid meteor showers

The Orionids meteor shower is expected to culminate early Thursday morning (October 21). In ideal conditions (dark moonless sky), you can see about 20 of these very fast oily pieces for hours. The shower will be displayed around October 21st, for about 2 days, at about 1/4 of the maximum intensity.

However, if you plan to observe these oiliness this year, there are major drawbacks. It’s a full moon. The full moon in October is traditionally known as the “Hunter’s Month” and will be Wednesday (October 20) in 2021. Then it will weaken (lost lighting). But when Orionids peaks early tomorrow morning, it’s still almost full.

Therefore, most of these streaks of light are extinguished by the bright moonlight. The exceptionally bright Orion meteor, which still flies far from Orion (where we got the name “Orion”), can still be seen at first glance.

Skywatchers can start looking for low orions in the pre-dawn eastern sky around the peak on October 20-21. The settings can be seen at the northern latitudes. Meteors may appear far from the constellation even if the meteor’s radiation or origin point is in Orion.

Skywatchers can start looking for low orions in the pre-dawn eastern sky around the peak on October 20-21. The settings can be seen at the northern latitudes. Meteors may appear far from the constellation even if the meteor’s radiation or origin point is in Orion. (Image credit: Starry Night Software)
At a speed of 41 miles per second (66 km), they appear in fast stripes, one hair faster than their spring sisters May’s Eta Aquarids. And the brightest “meteors”, such as the Eta Aquarid meteor shower, tend to leave long-lasting trains.

And, in fact, research shows that about half of all Orion constellations observed leave traces that last longer than other oils of the same brightness.

When and where to see

The constellation Orion (which seems to have originated from the meteor of Orion) now appears in front of us traveling around the Sun and did not completely float on the eastern horizon after 11:30 pm. Local daylight saving time. Best time around 5am-Orion is the highest in the southern sky. Orion is one of a few known meteor showers that can be observed equally well in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

Orionid activity tends to increase visibly around October 17, when the first pioneers are beginning to emerge. After peaking on the morning of October 21, activity begins to decline gradually, and around October 25, the time decreases to several times. The last loser can be witnessed occasionally in early November.

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